Aller au contenu
1984

Anti-racisme radical = Stérilité de la cause ?

Déchet(s) recommandé(s)

Je suis tombée sur cet article partagé par un ami photo journaliste, et il a suscité chez nous autres, français de culture, habitués au multiculturalisme jusqu'à l’os, une vague d’une certaine indignation.

Il est vrai que la journaliste essaye d’argumenter le cas des photographes, mais avec un poil de recul, on se rends compte à quel point son positionnement est radical et pas nécessairement gage d’une meilleure cohésion sociale. 

Dans la liste des arguments de l´auteur de l’article, il s’agit donc de laisser les photographes noirs prendre en charge les manifestations blm pour leur permettre de prendre contrôle de leur histoire politiquement parlant, car laisser l’information aux photographes blancs reviendrait à subir à nouveau le joug de l’opression blanche. 

( j’aimerai mettre l’article sous quote mais mon téléphone ne me le permets pas) 

 

Article pour L’insider, de :

Jun 12, 2020, 3:59 PM

D3EE9974-24C2-459C-9049-48CACE571075.jpeg.45eb474c016ff7c95d28971b9b0f7f5d.jpeg

Non-Black photographers need to step aside and let Black people tell their own stories. It's the most helpful thing they can do.

 

Right now, Black people are being attacked at every imaginable level. Black transgender women are brutalized and murdered. Black men are choked to death in the streets, gunned down on sidewalks, hunted and shot while jogging, and even shot to death sitting in their own homes. Black women are mysteriously falling from roofs, murdered in parking lots, and shot to death while sleeping in their beds.

The long-foreshadowed race war, which has been in progress since the dawn of Reconstruction and arguably before, appears new in the light of technology, the surveillance state, and the carceral state. The capacity for sharing the truths of this moment has been elevated to unimaginable heights because of the power and import of social media. Now, more than ever, Black people have the opportunity to share our stories and our experiences, from our perspectives, rewriting an egregious history of erasure and framing.

So why is it so hard for white photographers and white publications to stop erasing our voices?

Historically, depictions of Black people, Black life, and Black need have been grossly manipulated

The image of the Black man as a brute, savage, or animal finds its roots in slavery and the propaganda that was used to normalize Black people as property meant to be dominated. Caricatures of Black people as unintelligent and unintelligible, as Sambos and Sapphires, and as monsters and mammies, have had long-lasting effects on how Black people are perceived and treated around the world. 

During the current protests meant to honor the lives of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tony McDade, Sean Reed, and the many, many other Black people brutalized and murdered by state-sanctioned violence, Black people have had to contend with so much. We have had to reckon with insurmountable loss during a global pandemic that ruthlessly targets our communities. 

7C7525A3-9F75-4559-867C-857A006C82CE.thumb.jpeg.ed2a490a68cebc4af45077c5a5e36e49.jpeg

Many of us are so enraged by this current slew of atrocities that we've decided to put our own lives in jeopardy amidst the ravages of the pandemic; to storm the streets and demand something this country has never once offered its Black architects  —  justice.

We've had to deal with fantastical, destructive, and childish anarchists who treat this moment like a re-creation of "V for Vendetta" or the chaos largely romanticized in "Joker." These people cannot engage with the world unless it's through the lens of fantasy. 

They are fixated on stirring violence and setting things on fire, and they are co-opting the movement for Black lives and fixing the lens of this moment on Donald Trump and his cataclysmic failure as a human being and a president. But this unrest is about much more than the Orange Menace; it is about whiteness, white supremacy, violence, racism, fairness, and this country's refusal to reckon with its history. And in this moment, it is clearer than it has ever been that white folks still believe that they are the best people to tell our story in the mainstream.

Books, journalism, music, photography, and cinema have often tried to manipulate the viewer into adopting a specific viewpoint; consumers then deduce how to feel about a subject based on this perspective.

We are now witnessing the irresponsible legacy of this framing carry over to the coverage of these protests 

A prominent example can be found in Philip Montgomery's recent photo essay for Vanity Fair. The images, although beautiful, exposed protesters' faces, cinematized and sensationalized their outrage, and implied that moments of historical Black unrest are best captured by a non-Black photographer. Montgomery was even given unfettered access to George Floyd's memorial service. 

The photos stirred non-stop ethical debates in both Montgomery's and Vanity Fair's Instagram comments. After days of silence, Montgomery finally released a statement in his Instagram stories. It was mostly empty of any accountability or historical knowledge. Although Vanity Fair never responded to questions around their ethics and hiring practices, days later it  published a story that contained photographs sourced from a variety of Black and POC photographers, seemingly in an attempt to shift the conversation. 

New York Magazine, meanwhile,  chose to commemorate this moment in "George Floyd's America" by having a white photographer — ironically named Michael Christopher Brown — photograph their cover. This does nothing to honor Floyd's legacy; it simply builds on this country's dependence on racial erasure and historical amnesia. 

When Black photographers are included in this discourse, it is either as an afterthought or through plunder. Buzzfeed apparently understood the importance of looking at the current protests through the eyes of Black photographers, but simply embedded their images from Instagram, utilizing a new legal precedent. The product was a list that eloquently demonstrates the problems that Black photographers constantly face.

No one forces white photographers to accept assignments that involve lofty and intricate racial sensitivities

No one is forcing white photographers to imbue themselves with the power of telling a person or a people's story that they could never understand. No one forces white photographers to make personal bodies of work that center the plight and panic of the Black experience. 

As a photographer, you have the capacity to decline an assignment that you do not adequately understand. If white photographers and photojournalists cared about Black people and their Black peers, beyond putting a pointless black square on their Instagram profiles as some foolish attempt at public solidarity, they would simply decline these assignments, state the reasons why, and recommend someone from these communities to tell their own story.

More of the blame should be placed on the laziness and incompetence of the photo editors who look nothing like the people in the stories they commission. Over the past three years of working as a photographer, I have watched, gobsmacked, by the constant displays of favoritism, elitism, and nepotism in the photography industry.

Simply put, photo editors tend to hire those who resemble them. I have gotten into countless arguments with these people about their hiring practices. Many of the photo editors that I have spoken to have told me directly that they have colorblind hiring policies that don't consider race. That these institutions leave Black photographers out while simultaneously priding themselves on diversity and inclusion is laughable.

More importantly, how is it that white photo editors — who should know better than most about the importance of framing, and the history involved — don't understand the ethical responsibility they have to hire people from the communities they photograph? 

In photography, much of the visual discourse, from the Civil Rights Movement to the Movement for Black Lives, has been dominated by the same groups who put forth grotesque depictions of Black people

You can trace the plight and the violence that our community faces to the historical and global depictions of Black people as lazy, violent, and uneducated, instead of underfunded and under siege. When a white photographer shows up to our communities and sticks a camera in our faces, it directly contributes to this lineage. There's little reason to trust that this is not the very intention.

During the 2014 protests demanding justice for Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, innumerable white photographers stormed the community. They dove through crowds, ducked teargas canisters, and dodged rubber bullets meant to disperse the crowd. They did all of this to capture award-winning images. 

Robert Cohen captured an impactful photograph of activist Edward Crawford throwing a tear gas canister back at police. While Cohen won himself a Pulitzer, Crawford was found dead from a gunshot wound, an alleged suicide. (Five other men, all with connections to the protests, have since died under mysterious circumstances.) 

With the advancement of surveillance technology, everybody participating in protests has a responsibility to blur out the faces of protesters, or find new ways to photograph them that makes them unidentifiable. This is paramount. White photographers and publications neglecting this practice, with the intention to win awards, can be fatal.

These conversations are now taking place online and across social media. Photography collectives like Women Photograph, Authority Collective, and Diversify Photo have been vocal about urging white photographers and publications to reconsider their harmful practices. 

They've written open letters to discriminatory contests, publications, and camera companies, doing social media takeovers that highlight the brilliant work of Black photographers and photographers of color for hire, and creating resource databases for readings and events that hope to further the agenda of equalizing the playing field.

During the current protests, Authority Collective created a resource called "Do No Harm: Photographing Police Brutality Protests" that urges the reader to reconsider and interrogate the role, history, and intentions of white photographers and publications as well as offering best practices.

Speaking to white people about justice and truth, for so many of us, feels like screaming in agony into a void of intentional ignorance. The consequences of racial bias and media framing, the continued painting of Black people as animals, as violent, as deserving of extermination, as anything other than human, is bolstered every time white and non-Black photographers are commissioned to tell our stories. 

White and non-Black photographers continue to pillage our communities, to profit from our culture, our aesthetics, our anguish, while never offering us opportunities to right the wrongs of history and create truer narratives. There are more than enough capable, skilled photographers around the globe to tell their own stories. We must  stop offering the pen that writes the narratives of our lives and our histories to the same white men and women who have and continue to do us the most harm.

A real show of love for Black people involves simply listening. It involves recalibrating your thinking and reconditioning the harmful, voyeuristic, white supremacist sensationalism that so many photographers and publications champion. 

Most importantly, it means hiring brilliant Black photographers and all photographers of color. There is a history out there that needs correcting. Let us tell our own stories. 

Gioncarlo Valentine is an award-winning American photographer and writer based in New York. Backed by his seven years in the social work field, Valentine's work focuses on issues faced by marginalized populations, most often focusing his lens on the experiences of Black/LGBTQIA+ communities.  He is a regular contributor to The New York Times and has had his work published in Propublica, Esquire, The Fader, The Rumpus, and The New Yorker.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Lol. No need to. Le début suffit à lancer le débat. Les arguments pour sont dans le texte.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Pourquoi les gens en France sont indignés par l'article ? Tu parles de stérilité de la cause et de cohésion sociale, mais encore ? 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 44 minutes, Ecce Homo a dit :

Pourquoi les gens en France sont indignés par l'article ? Tu parles de stérilité de la cause et de cohésion sociale, mais encore ? 

Parce que c'est littéralement raciste de définir les droits des individus par leur couleur de peau.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 48 minutes, Ecce Homo a dit :

Pourquoi les gens en France sont indignés par l'article ? Tu parles de stérilité de la cause et de cohésion sociale, mais encore ? 

Pour la première affirmation, je me suis peut être emballée. Des commentaires que j’en ai vu, l’initiative semble clivante et contre productive.

a mon avis, si chacun devient délégué à sa catégorie sociale, sexuelle ou religieuse, le monde ne fait aucun sens et aucune cohésion n’est possible. Imagine si les femmes devaient être les seules à documenter leurs actions, à couvrir médiatiquement chaque manifestation, le problème serait le même. Ça ne favorise en rien l’accueil des causes défendues, cela fédère des rixes et d’autres dérives radicalisantes. Imo

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

je sais pas. tu abordes deux sujets. j'ai lu l'article en diagonale, mais je suis all in quand il s'agit de mouvements radicaux (de gauche, s'entend que je prêche pour ma paroisse ici) pour faire avancer les causes sociales. ce n'est pas en étant modérées, diplomates et raisonnables que les femmes ont obtenu l'égalité de droit. c'est en manifestant dans les rues, en brûlant des soutiens-gorge et en faisant des grèves du ménage qu'elles y sont parvenues. même chose pour les droits LGBTQ et un peu plus loin dans l'histoire la cause syndicale.

pour ce qui est de l'article en question, je ne qualifierai même pas de radical la pensée de l'auteur. l'auteur dit qu'il faut donner la parole aux Noirs quant il s'agit de raconter leur propre histoire, ce qui fait beaucoup de sens épistémologiquement parlant. cette notion ne date pas d'hier, en anthropologie notamment, il y a un grand soucis porté sur la notion de relativisme culturel dans la méthodologie. avant, la façon de le voir c'était que le sujet (l'homme blanc) étudiait un objet (une autre culture) sous son propre spectre de vision du monde. ça donnait des travaux fortement teintés par la pensée colonialiste occidentale axée sur la domination culturelle.

par exemple, Freud dans The Logic of Totem and Taboo, désignait les peuples aborigènes en Australie de "poor naked cannibals"  (pauvres cannibales nus) dépourvus de moralité et les étudiait comme s'il s'agissait d'une sous-race. ce sont ce genre de dérives qui ont fait naître un soucis de donner aux cultures la parole pour raconter leurs propres histoires.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Les ant-racistes sont eux meme raciste entre eux.. et les représentants cherchent la provocation et la confrontation pour pouvoir ensuite jouer les victimes dans les médias ..  Ces gens veulent réécrire l'histoire  et faire porter le poids  du passé sur la société entière. Ce sont des vidanges.

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 18 heures, Ecce Homo a dit :

je sais pas. tu abordes deux sujets. j'ai lu l'article en diagonale, mais je suis all in quand il s'agit de mouvements radicaux (de gauche, s'entend que je prêche pour ma paroisse ici) pour faire avancer les causes sociales. ce n'est pas en étant modérées, diplomates et raisonnables que les femmes ont obtenu l'égalité de droit. c'est en manifestant dans les rues, en brûlant des soutiens-gorge et en faisant des grèves du ménage qu'elles y sont parvenues. même chose pour les droits LGBTQ et un peu plus loin dans l'histoire la cause syndicale.

pour ce qui est de l'article en question, je ne qualifierai même pas de radical la pensée de l'auteur. l'auteur dit qu'il faut donner la parole aux Noirs quant il s'agit de raconter leur propre histoire, ce qui fait beaucoup de sens épistémologiquement parlant. cette notion ne date pas d'hier, en anthropologie notamment, il y a un grand soucis porté sur la notion de relativisme culturel dans la méthodologie. avant, la façon de le voir c'était que le sujet (l'homme blanc) étudiait un objet (une autre culture) sous son propre spectre de vision du monde. ça donnait des travaux fortement teintés par la pensée colonialiste occidentale axée sur la domination culturelle.

par exemple, Freud dans The Logic of Totem and Taboo, désignait les peuples aborigènes en Australie de "poor naked cannibals"  (pauvres cannibales nus) dépourvus de moralité et les étudiait comme s'il s'agissait d'une sous-race. ce sont ce genre de dérives qui ont fait naître un soucis de donner aux cultures la parole pour raconter leurs propres histoires.

Je comprends ce que tu veux dire, mais pour les suffragettes et les défenseurs LGBT il y avait là des demandes concrètes, des actions visées et justes, des mises à jour au niveau juridique. ( Freud est relatif à son époque, je ne pense pas que des auteurs plus récents et qui ne soient pas affichés racistes -comme houellebec- fassent de l’anthroprologie de cette façon.) Cela dit je comprends quand même ce que tu signifies, et cet article va dans ton sens: 

https://www.nationalgeographic.fr/photographie/2018/03/pendant-des-decennies-nos-reportages-etaient-racistes-pour-nous-en-detacher-il?fbclid=IwAR06JpBAvuKKFe48XQMbQL-N8iwwlvB_2GDq8L3_SSCdlNlmEc3iwjTBe7s

Mais faut quand même avoir besoin ce qu’on veut ici Qu’est ce que demande concrètement la communauté afro américaine ?  les afro-américains demandent une police saine et sûre, qui soit débarrassée de ses éléments racistes et que ceux ci soient punis pour les meurtres commis. Reformer une justice policière qui soit égalitaire, ça c’est une volonté concrète qui aurait un réel impact sur cette situation précise. C’est straight to the point.

 

Concrètement, voici l’impact que la volonté de l’auteur de l’article aurait : une poignée de dude qui pigent plus que les autres, mais seulement lorsque les médias se décident à porter la parole noire. C’est vrai, il ou ils sont noirs et légitimes. Et la portée sur la cause blm dans tout ceci ? Car si le photographe est noir, l’éditorialiste ne l’est pas forcément, les groupes média non plus et l’histoire reste écrite par des blancs. C’est quoi l’intérêt de concentrer sur ce maillon de la chaîne ?

Je ne sais pas si c’est le manque de culture historique qui caractérise les américains peu importe leur couleur de peau, mais c’est assez effarant de parler de l’esclavage en 2020 comme si ça avait du sens. Esclavage économique, oui, comme avec nos arabes et nos africains en France en fait.

Ces revendications raciales sur fond de lutte des classes, n’indiquent qu’une chose, c’est que le colonialisme est désormais économique et que c’est pour cette raison que les communautés d’origine africaine restent aussi pauvres malgré les pays développés qui les accueillent ( pour de la main d’oeuvre Bon marché en France, comme dans les années 80 avec l’Algerie).

Le phénomène des guetto est, selon moi, l’exemple parfait de cette volonté de clivage ethnique et social hautement politisé, et donc la réelle oppression « blanche » dont nous parlons. Je crois qu’il y aurait plus de sens à imposer la mixité sociale qu’a imposer des barrières à l’accès médiatique des groupes communautaires, tu ne penses pas ? Ce n’est pas en manifestant en communautés distinctes qu’on changera le fonctionnement de ce pouvoir économique agressif, c’est en créant au contraire une union solidaire entre citoyens de toute origine. D'où le « unissons nous ».

On s’entends qu’on ne combat pas les disfonctions judiciaires et les problèmes communautaires avec des Pulitzer. 

Il serait d’ailleurs temps que tous les pays coloniaux assument leurs crimes contre l’humanité pour couper court aux discours de tels éléments radicaux. Que les USA éduquent les enfants à l’ecole sur le genocide amérindien, que l’europe (et même que le monde arabe) reconnaisse la traite des noirs. Qu’on ait des journées commémoratives, des statues, des musées bref des éléments de culture qu’on puisse intégrer et qu’on puisse éduquer comme on l’a fait avec la Shoah, que ça soit une partie de notre histoire même si elle est degueulasse. 

Cette attitude d’entre soi ne favorise que le sentiment de rejet, la haine, l’incompréhension. On l’à vu avec les causes religieuses. Plus une personne nous semble renfermée sur elle même et sa culture, plus on lui est réfractaire et plus on la stigmatise.

Évidemment, lorsqu’une communauté est stigmatisée, elle se replie sur elle même. Et plus elle se replie sur elle même, plus elle donne raison a la culture dominante de la rejeter car celle ci y trouve des justifications de ne pas l'intégrer. Voilà pourquoi il ne faut jamais laisser les radicaux communautaires inspirer les groupes, car ils génèrent plus de racisme consequentiel que d’ouverture au sujet. 

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 10 heures, Nostradaw00t a dit :

Les ant-racistes sont eux meme raciste entre eux.. [...]

 

Jean Messiah, anti-raciste ? Il est au RN, parti d'extrême droite français.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Répondre à woot = perte de temps 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Un truc qui me frustre dans tout ça, c’est que c’est pas parce que t’es blanc que tu n’as pas de descendant noir. C’est contraire aux lois de la génétique de se penser comme pur natif de quelque part ou pur sang de quelque chose. Les juifs sont blancs pourtant ils ne sont pas vraiment incriminés par le grand groupe de l’oppresseur blanc type, on remarquera.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Je crois que c'est de trop tirer la prophétique couverte de l'autre bord. Supprimer des points de vue, en restreignant des individus (photographes), n'est pas le bon levier je pense. Effectivement, le dernier paragraphe que tu soulignes en gras, me paraît une généralisation dommageable.

Citation

Non black photographer needs to step aside

Je ne suis pas sûr qu'un photographe blanc qui décide de ne pas couvrir un évènement pour "laisser la place" ait un impact de quelque ordre. Le racisme systémique veut dire que depuis plusieurs générations, le "système" empêche l'émergence d'opinions et de visions qui viennent de ces communautés. Ça ne veut pas dire qu'on empêche PERSONNELLEMENT quelqu'un simplement en exerçant sa passion.

Là où je tombe d'accord, c'est de ne pas être dans la passivité, mais d'utiliser nos privilèges pour s'intéresser et défendre la diversité des points de vues (et d'être conscient qu'on a possiblement un biais positif qui travaille pour nous, dans une certaine mesure).

On peut faire un parallèle avec les autochtones au Canada, qu'on a relégués dans des réserves, condamnés à la pauvreté et traumatisés à grands coups de pensionnats. Ceux qui offrent une vision de ce passé et ce présent trouble sont pour la plupart des blancs financés par l'état à coup millions pour leurs oeuvres. Ce n'empêche pas la pertinence de leur démarche, mais ça paralyse le débat et l'émergence de ceux qui n'ont pas ces moyens (à cause du racisme systémique et de la classe dominante, l'histoire par les vainqueurs etc.) L'affaire Robert Lepage le prouve. Bref, on ne doit pas censurer, mais je pense qu'on doit comprendre la valeur d'aider à élever différentes voix (on ne peut pas éliminer les éditeurs racistes qui ont du pouvoir, mais on peut les condamner, ne pas travailler pour eux et souligner le travail digne).

Ceci dit, la descendance, un autre bon argument pour le raciste ordinaire. Des plans pour qu'il te dise que "justement, ça veut dire que la loi de Darwin du plus fort à gagné".

 

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 9 heures, Retro Rick a dit :

Jean Messiah, anti-raciste ? Il est au RN, parti d'extrême droite français.

L'autre en face est encore pire, c'est un nazi noir....

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 48 minutes, Nostradaw00t a dit :

L'autre en face est encore pire, c'est un nazi noir....

T'as pété un plomb ou bien. Un black, par essence, ne peut être nazi. 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 5 minutes, Retro Rick a dit :

Un black, par essence, ne peut être nazi.

Yep. Le nazisme, c'est l'ultime consécration de la suprématie arienne sur le reste du monde. (c'est quand même pas rien)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 2 minutes, TheCrow a dit :

[...] (c'est quand même pas rien)

Un point de détail de l'histoire. 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 2 heures, Commissaire Laviolette a dit :

Des plans pour qu'il te dise que "justement, ça veut dire que la loi de Darwin du plus fort à gagné".

Et tous l'monde sais aujourd’hui que Darwin roulait souvent à coté d'la track.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 41 minutes, Retro Rick a dit :

T'as pété un plomb ou bien. Un black, par essence, ne peut être nazi. 

C'est un suprématiste noir ultra extrémiste qui veut déconstruire l'histoire.  Ecoute le débat tu vas comprendre.  Il faut aussi écouter les discours qu'il fait lors de manifs pour comprendre à quel point c’est un raciste suprématiste noir. Il dit des absurdités comme « La France, est un Etat totalitaire, terroriste, esclavagiste, colonialiste. »

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Un déchet à ajouter?

Publiez tout de suite et complétez l'inscription plus tard. Si vous êtes déjà l'un des nôtres, connectez-vous pour publier sous votre compte.
Note: Votre message devra être approuvé par un modérateur. Patience.

Invité
Répondre à ce sujet…

×   Vous avez collé du contenu avec mise en forme.   Supprimer la mise en forme

  Seulement 75 émoticônes maximum sont autorisées.

×   Votre lien a été automatiquement intégré.   Afficher plutôt comme un lien

×   Votre contenu précédent a été rétabli.   Vider l’éditeur

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Chargement

×
×
  • Créer...